Blog Archives

Feature: The Domesticity of Victorian Children’s Homes

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Our September feature is an edited version of the winning CGAP student prize paper at the VAHS’s summer 2013 fifth international research conference. ‘Institutional Homeliness: Charitable Initiatives of Domesticity in the Victorian Children’s Welfare Insitution’ by Claudia Soares of the University of Manchester. … Continue reading

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Feature: Barnardo’s Photographic Archive – wider issues

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Our August feature brings a wide angle lens to a controversial issue at the moment. Photographic historian Michael Pritchard considers the worth of Barnardo’s extensive and historically valuable photographic archive, which is currently being digitised ahead of an uncertain future. … Continue reading

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Feature: New Research on Oxfam’s Operation Oasis

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Our July feature comes from Marie-Luise Ermisch of Canada’s McGill University, winner of the History Workshop Bursary to attend our international research conference this month. She writes on the topic of her conference paper: Oxfam’s Operation Oasis: Teaching British Youth about Global Poverty. … Continue reading

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Feature: New Research on Save the Children

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After winning the Economic History Society Bursary to attend our summer conference, Emily Baughan writes for our June feature on The Save the Children Fund, the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child and a Charter for Stateless Children, 1919-1940. … Continue reading

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Feature: Kaiserwerth Deaconesses

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For our May feature, Carmen Mangion reports back for us from an academic conference in Germany on the history of deaconesses, religious women who were part of a transnational movement at the heart of nineteenth-century care and provision for the poor. … Continue reading

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