Tag Archives: families

Feature: New Research on Save the Children

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After winning the Economic History Society Bursary to attend our summer conference, Emily Baughan writes for our June feature on The Save the Children Fund, the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child and a Charter for Stateless Children, 1919-1940. … Continue reading

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Waifs and Strays at Christmas

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Claudia Soares, University of Manchester For many nineteenth-century voluntary welfare organisations, there was a competitive market to obtain charitable donations. As such, Christmas was framed as an important means to evoke compassion and a sense of moral obligation amongst potential … Continue reading

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Charity in the Novels of Charles Dickens

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Frank Christianson, Brigham Young University “What connexion [sic] can there have been between many people in the innumerable histories of this world, who, from opposite sides of great gulfs, have, nevertheless, been very curiously brought together?” Dickens spends several hundred … Continue reading

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Podcast: The Myth of the 1950s Housewife – Voluntary women’s organisations and the challenge to idealised domesticity in postwar Britain

VAHS Seminar given by Caitriona Beaumont of London South Bank University on 6 December 2010  [audio https://historyspot.org.uk/sites/default/files/field/media-file/vahs-20101206_0.mp3] Powerpoint slides ABSTRACT The changing role of women in post war British society has been well-documented by historians, for example Jane Lewis (1992), Sue Bruley … Continue reading

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Podcast: Following ‘The Absent-Minded Beggar’ – a case-history of a fund-raising campaign of the South African War

VAHS Seminar given by Dr John Lee of the University of Bristol on 22 November 2010 ABSTRACT Kipling’s poem was written at the very beginning of the South African war to raise money for the families of soldiers. It was … Continue reading

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