Author Archives: Kerrie Holloway

Don’t overlook this important contribution to the historiography of voluntary action! – Colin Rochester

Back in May 2018 one of our committee members, Bob Snape, used the VAHS Blog to introduce his book on Leisure, Voluntary Action and Social Change 1880-1939. I am embarrassed to admit that I missed Bob’s post and have only just … Continue reading

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A Different Kind of Conference: some reflections from Colin Rochester, one of the founders of the VAHS

Those who haven’t taken part in any of the six previous international conferences on the history of voluntary action may not be expecting the distinctive experience of the seventh event scheduled for the University of Liverpool in July 2020. Yes, … Continue reading

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Feature: Community building in Notting Hill: online archive for nursery centre

Michael Locke is an independent writer, researcher and adviser, formerly employed by the University of East London, Volunteering England and NCVO. In this blog, Mike reports on a new archive of community history, which covers the ground of his witness … Continue reading

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Feature: Charity in the Georgian Era: Lessons for Today?

Andrew Rudd is a Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Exeter and has previously worked as the Parliamentary Manager at the Charity Commission. In this blog, he reflects on the lessons learned by researching the history of 18th-century … Continue reading

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Celebrating 25 years of studying the history of voluntary action: VAHS’s Conference 2016

Colin Rochester first published the following blog detailing next year’s conference on HistPhil.org, a web publication  on the history of the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors, with a particular emphasis on how history can shed light on contemporary philanthropic issues and practice. In … Continue reading

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